Patient Information

1. Introduction

What is anaesthesia?
Who is the anaesthetist
Types of anaesthesia

2. What can you do at home?

There are some things you can do to prepare yourself for your operation: 1- If you smoke: Smoking reduces the oxygen in your blood and increases the sensitivity of your lungs. Consider giving up smoking 8 weeks before your operation. This reduces the risk of breathing problems and makes your anaesthetic safer. The longer you…

3. On the day of Admission & day of Surgery

There are some things you can do to prepare yourself for your operation: Nothing to eat and drink – fasting ‘Nil By Mouth’ (NBM) The nurses on the ward will give you clear instructions about fasting. It is important to follow these. If you have taken food within 6 hours before anaesthesia or liquids 3…

4. After your operation

Back to the ward: The surgeons or anaesthetist will give instructions as to how long you have to continue to be fasted. High Dependency Unit (HDU) / Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU): After some major operations, you may be taken to SICU directly from OT. This is to allow closer monitoring to help you recover…

5. Pain Relief

Your anaesthetist will have discussed with you the ways of controlling your pain after your operation. You can expect to have good pain relief. • Good pain relief is important. • It prevents suffering, helps you breathe and move more easily hastening your recovery. • Some people will need more pain relief than others. •…

6. Benefits & risks of anaesthesia

Anaesthesia has made much of today‚Äôs surgery possible, and has brought great benefits. Today, joints can be replaced, organs can be transplanted, and disease tissue can be removed with a high degree of comfort and safety. The benefit of anaesthesia needs to be weighed against the risks of the anaesthetic procedure and the drugs used.…

7. Side effects and complications of anaesthesia

Common Nausea & vomiting Sore throat Dizziness & feeling faint Shivering Headache Itching Aches, muscle pains & backache Pain Bruising & soreness Confusion or memory loss Chest infection Bladder problems Uncommon Breathing difficulties Damage to teeth, lips or tongue Worsening of existing medical condition Awareness Rare or Very rare Damage to the eyes Serious allergy…

8. Day Care Anaesthesia

Many minor operations these days are carried out as day case. This means you will come into hospital on the day of your operation, often only for a short time before it is due to start. You will be seen by your anaesthetist on the day of admission in the ward. Please bring all your…

9. Anaesthesia for children

Children need anaesthesia for operations just like adults. They may feel distressed and their parents can feel anxious. Anaesthetists recognise this, and do their best to keep the distress and anxiety down to a minimum. Children may come into hospital on the same day as the operation, unless it is a major surgery. They are…

10. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What time is my operation?
How long will I be in the operating theatre?
How long will I be anaesthetied?